Oddments

In search of story


8 Comments

February 8.19

Yesterday, dear reader, came the fifth sunless day of rain in five days. Also came the haulers in a pickup truck pulling an open wooden cart. They hauled stuff from my garage and then we drove to my storage unit and they hauled stuff from there.

And the rain poured down.

I followed them out of the storage place, and there was no way not to see the detritus of my life, soaked and wilted, riding in front of me. The big cardboard box with the old Christmas tree figured prominently in the heap. Some of the stiff old branches had fallen out and, formed yet in their bent upward curve, lay there appearing to wave goodbye to me. It was the forlornest vignette to be imagined.

That tree belonged to my parents and had seen many, many Christmases. Yes, I still have the top. Yes, it was time to let it go.

But did it have to wave at me?

And the rain poured down.

I came home and attacked the garage, sweeping and shoving and piling. The temperature was 59 and it was suddenly April. We haven’t seen the sun all week, but there was warmth! The daylilies were sprouting!

This morning the temperature is 18, windchill 0. A winter wind rattles the house and my head. Poor daylilies. Poor old frozen Christmas tree.

Mourning is a process not meant to be cured or stopped or unfelt. Grief will be, just as the winter rains will be. I loathe Pollyanna-isms, but there are those sprouting daylilies.

 


2 Comments

February 2.19

 

The deep deep woods

is guarded by

a small small troll

two inches high;

he’ll challenge you

with round round eye

in little hole —

a sly sly spy.

If you would walk

his white white earth,

you pay his toll,

the tax on worth,

not in penny-ante cents

but still still pause

of reverence.

 

 

With many thanks to photographer Mary Jo Bassett.

And also thanks to Johnny Gruelle,

who introduced me to the deep deep woods in his Raggedy Ann stories ever so long ago.