Oddments

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February 16.19

 

Life Lesson #Umpteen from The School of Emmy

 

To walk in someone else’s shoes

is often our intent

but when we say “me too”

“not you” is what we meant.

“Me too” implies I’ve worn your shoes

and walked a mile therein

but I never have and never will

I don’t live in your skin.

“Me too” springs all too easy

from lips of listener

who doesn’t want to listen

but be the raconteur.

Emmy begs to show us

sometimes we must admit

“me too” is incommodious:

the other’s shoes don’t fit.

 

 

Thanks to photographer Patrick Mesterharm

and, of course, to Emmy.

“Me too” has been on my mind and I’m grateful to Emmy for her insights.

More in another post.

 

 

 


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Connections: May 11.18

Some ancient mythic language

ebbing, swelling, weightless

like liquid air

many-voiced

chorus of Sophocles

bade me stop.

I turned toward the sound

the fullness of new leaves

spring petals

soft as babies

supple in newness

stroked by wind

sibilant and sure

wanting me to know

something.

Still as the dead

I listened

taut

to pluck a word

but there was none.

 

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Connections: October 29.17

Deaf phone line

hard blue chair

what’s the point?

no one’s there

austere right angles

sterile, glistening

rigid vacuum:

no one’s listening.

You may think this

nihilistic

but caregivers know

it’s realistic.

 

One of the reasons I started my blog was to write about caregiving. I return to that subject from time to time although I continually grapple with the related issue of denial. It’s so much easier to deny than to listen because listening requires acknowledging. But denial makes the caregiver’s isolation unimaginably more damaging.

 

With thanks to the S.W. Berg Photo Archives for this expressive, poignant photo.

 

Connections


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Connections: September 30

OI - 2015-09 - 49I say hello,

you say goodbye —

the Beatles said it for us .

Hello, I must be going —

Groucho led the chorus.

The rub is plain ‘mid kith and kin

 — we do not want to bore us —

does Hello? end or does it begin?

Please listen, we implore us.

Thanks more to the S.W. Berg Archives.

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